Welcome to dickforsman.com

A once-in-a-lifetime situation. On a recent trip up north I found a perched 2nd cy female Gyr clearly on the lookout for something to eat. I watched her for quite some time when she suddenly got very alert and sleek and then took off. I could hear skuas giving the excited alarm calls as I was following the Gyr through my camera, hoping to get the mobbing skua and the Gyr in the same frame. Soon I saw something move in the upper corner of the viewfinder, an adult male Peregrine carrying prey! This was what the Gyr had set out for. In the blink of an eye the Gyr caught up with the Peregrine, which was clearly struggling with its relatively large prey (a presumed Golden Plover) and after a few twists the Peregrine let go of its quarry, which was immediately grabbed by the Gyr in mid-air! You would imagine that a female Gyr, weighing about twice as much as the male Peregrine, would be slow and clumsy, but it was an exploding pack of dynamite. Afterwards I checked the timing on my camera and it only took it 10 seconds from leaving its perch to outfly the Peregrine and steel its prey, truly unforgettable! Just now, too many things at hand to keep up with, but I hope to be back before too long with some more images from my recent trips up north. Stay tuned.

A once-in-a-lifetime situation. On a recent trip up north I found a perched 2nd cy female Gyr clearly on the lookout for something to eat. I had watched her for quite some time, when she suddenly got very alert and sleek and then took off. I could hear skuas giving their excited alarm calls as I was following the Gyr through my camera, hoping to get the mobbing skua and the Gyr in the same frame. Soon I saw something move in the upper corner of the viewfinder, an adult male Peregrine carrying prey! This was what the Gyr had set out for. In the blink of an eye the Gyr caught up with the Peregrine, the fastest creature in the world, which was clearly struggling with its relatively large prey (a presumed Golden Plover) and after a few tight corners the Peregrine let go of its quarry, which was immediately grabbed by the Gyr in mid-air! You would imagine that a female Gyr, weighing more than twice as much as the male Peregrine, would be slow and clumsy, but it was an exploding pack of dynamite. Afterwards I checked the timing on my camera and it only took the Gyr 10 seconds from leaving its perch to outfly the Peregrine and steel its prey, truly unforgettable! Just now, too many things at hand to keep up with, but I hope to be back before too long with some more images from my recent trips up north. Stay tuned.


Relating articles

Blog categories